Loaded TEUs (IMPTEU, EXPTEU, VOLTEU, and SPDTEU)

 

Loaded TEUs - Imported

(IMPTEU)

What is it?

This is the monthly total of containerized freight volumes imported into US ports as officially reported by each respective US port authority. This is measured in twenty-foot-equivalent units (TEUs), which is a measurement used in the maritime industry to record international containerized freight volumes. Even though these volumes are reported as if all containerized volumes were 20 ft. containers, it is important to note that these reported volumes can also include a combination of 20 ft., 40 ft., 40 ft. High Cube, and 45 ft. containers. If the port records a 40 ft. container passing through, then it is reported as if it were 2 x 20 ft. containers, or 2 TEUs. 

Who is interested?

Freight forwarders, NVOCCs, ocean carriers, port authorities, terminals, rail/intermodal companies, financial institutions, brokers, truckload carriers, warehousing companies, and anyone else interested in import volumes into US ports.

What does it tell me?

Loaded import TEU volumes at major US ports are very good indicators of freight volumes moving into subsequent port cities. Since a lot of freight originates overseas and then disseminates into freight networks across the US, these loaded TEU volumes can help predict trends in freight volumes across the US. For instance, if loaded TEU volumes are increasing month-over-month, then it is highly likely that truckload, LTL, and intermodal freight volumes will increase as well.

 

Loaded TEUs - Exported

(EXPTEU) 

What is it?

This is the monthly total of containerized freight volumes exported from US ports as officially reported by each respective US port authority. This is measured in twenty-foot-equivalent units (TEUs), which is a measurement used in the maritime industry to record international containerized freight volumes. Even though these volumes are reported as if all containerized volumes were 20 ft. containers, it is important to note that these reported volumes can also include a combination of 20 ft., 40 ft., 40 ft. High Cube, and 45 ft. containers. If the port records a 40 ft. container passing through, then it is reported as if it were 2 x 20 ft. containers (2 TEUs). 

Who is interested?

Freight forwarders, NVOCCs, ocean carriers, port authorities, terminals, rail/intermodal companies, financial institutions, brokers, truckload carriers, warehousing companies, and anyone else interested in export volumes.

What does it tell me?

Loaded export TEU volumes at major US ports are very good indicators of freight volumes moving out of subsequent port cities. Loaded Export TEU volumes can a leading indicator of how U.S. exports are trending or performing in the global economy. For instance, if loaded TEU volumes are increasing month-over-month, then it is highly likely that U.S. exporters are finding increased demand for the U.S. made goods abroad. Generally, when the U.S. dollar has a lower value relative to other world currencies, then exports will likely increase and this is a great indicator to keep track of that shift. Conversely, if the dollar is strong and has a higher value, exports will normally drop as these U.S. goods become more expensive.

 

Loaded TEUs - Total

(VOLTEU)

What is it?

This is the monthly total of containerized freight volumes being imported and exported through US ports as officially reported by each respective US port authority. This is measured in twenty-foot-equivalent units (TEUs), which is a measurement used in the maritime industry to record international containerized freight volumes. Even though these volumes are reported as if all containerized volumes were 20 ft. containers, it is important to note that these reported volumes can also include a combination of 20 ft., 40 ft., 40 ft. High Cube, and 45 ft. containers. If the port records a 40 ft. container passing through, then it is reported as if it were 2 x 20 ft. containers, or 2 TEUs. 

Who is interested?

Freight forwarders, NVOCCs, ocean carriers, port authorities, terminals, rail/intermodal companies, financial institutions, brokers, truckload carriers, warehousing companies, and anyone else interested in both import and export volumes moving through US ports. 

What does it tell me?

Loaded TEU volumes at major US ports are very good indicators of freight volumes moving into, and out of, subsequent port cities. Looking at total TEU volumes for both imports and exports can assist in identifying ports that are responsible for a large portion of US freight movements in and out of the country. Since around 90% of global trade occurs via maritime shipping, loaded TEU volumes can also assist in understanding the overall health of US trade in the global economy. If total loaded TEU volumes are increasing month over month, then one can assume that US trade with foreign countries is also increasing. Conversely, If loaded TEU volumes are declining month over month, then one can assume that US trade with foreign countries is also in decline.

 

Loaded TEU Spread

(SPDTEU)

What is it?

This is the monthly difference between loaded containerized import and export volumes at US ports as officially reported by each respective US port authority. This is measured in twenty-foot-equivalent units (TEUs), which is a measurement used in the maritime industry to record international containerized freight volumes. Even though these volumes are reported as if all containerized volumes were 20 ft. containers, it is important to note that these reported volumes can also include a combination of 20 ft., 40 ft., 40 ft. High Cube, and 45 ft. containers. If the port records a 40 ft. container passing through, then it is reported as if it were 2 x 20 ft. containers, or 2 TEUs. 

Who is interested?

Freight forwarders, NVOCCs, ocean carriers, port authorities, terminals, rail/intermodal companies, financial institutions, brokers, truckload carriers, warehousing companies, and anyone else interested in the difference between loaded import TEUs and export TEUs at US ports. 

What does it tell me?

Loaded TEU volumes at major US ports are very good indicators of freight volumes moving into, and out of, subsequent port cities. Looking at the spread (difference) between loaded import and export TEU volumes can assist in identifying the trade imbalance at a given US port. If a port handles more loaded import TEU volumes than loaded export TEU volumes, then one can assume that the port serves as a major destination for US imports, than it does for a major origin port for US exporters. Since around 90% of global trade occurs via maritime shipping, the loaded TEU spread can also assist in understanding the overall health of US trade in imports and exports in the global economy. If loaded TEU import volumes are increasing, and the loaded TEU spread is also increasing, then that means that loaded exports at that port are either decreasing or staying the same. Conversely, if loaded TEU import volumes are decreasing, and the loaded TEU spread is also decreasing, then one can assume that loaded export volumes are either increasing or staying the same.